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מים וחדשנות טכנולוגית

מים והסתגלות לשינויי אקלים

Water and Technological Innovation

Water & Climate Change Adaptation

ד"ר רוסלנה רחל פלטניק
דור פרידמן
Dr. Ruslana Rachel Palatnik
Dor Fridman

The value of alternative water in adaptation to Climate Change: The case of the Mediterranean countries

Background: GTAP-AW (Palatnik, Raviv, Sirota, & Shechter, Under review) enhances the foundational GTAP model (Hertel, 1997) by incorporating desalinated and treated water and irrigated agriculture as distinct economic sectors within the global CGE framework. The desalinated and treated water sectors are conceptualized as intermediate factors of production alongside the freshwater industry, encompassing the extraction, collection, treatment, and distribution of water to end-users. To obtain this, the original water sector in GTAP was split into three sectors: desalination, treated water, and water distribution. In addition, the agricultural sector was disaggregated into rain-fed and irrigated agriculture. The three water-related and two agricultural sectors, along with energy, industry, and other economic sectors are characterized by their consumption of intermediate inputs and their reliance on the availability of capital, natural resources, labor, and land (Palatnik, Raviv, Sirota, & Shechter, Under review). Activity data: Building on the GTAP10A database (Aguiar, Chepeliev, Corong, McDougall, & van der Mensbrugghe, 2019) new alternative water sectors and irrigated vs rainfed agriculture sectors were calibrated to the year 2014 using available data on water consumption patterns by countries/regions (FAO, AQUASTAT Core Database, 2021; FAO, Aquastat, 2014) and the costs structure of newly introduced sectors (Plat, Lambry, Donadieu de Lavit, & de la Touanne, 2019; Baum, Palatnik, Kan, & Rapaport-Rom, 2016). Energy consumption approach: Within the GTAP-AW model, the energy consumption patterns of the water industries adhere to a specified general functional form. This approach ensures the representation of the relative energy intensities of these sectors within the established database

The value of alternative water in adaptation to Climate Change: The case of the Mediterranean countries

Background: GTAP-AW (Palatnik, Raviv, Sirota, & Shechter, Under review) enhances the foundational GTAP model (Hertel, 1997) by incorporating desalinated and treated water and irrigated agriculture as distinct economic sectors within the global CGE framework. The desalinated and treated water sectors are conceptualized as intermediate factors of production alongside the freshwater industry, encompassing the extraction, collection, treatment, and distribution of water to end-users. To obtain this, the original water sector in GTAP was split into three sectors: desalination, treated water, and water distribution. In addition, the agricultural sector was disaggregated into rain-fed and irrigated agriculture. The three water-related and two agricultural sectors, along with energy, industry, and other economic sectors are characterized by their consumption of intermediate inputs and their reliance on the availability of capital, natural resources, labor, and land (Palatnik, Raviv, Sirota, & Shechter, Under review). Activity data: Building on the GTAP10A database (Aguiar, Chepeliev, Corong, McDougall, & van der Mensbrugghe, 2019) new alternative water sectors and irrigated vs rainfed agriculture sectors were calibrated to the year 2014 using available data on water consumption patterns by countries/regions (FAO, AQUASTAT Core Database, 2021; FAO, Aquastat, 2014) and the costs structure of newly introduced sectors (Plat, Lambry, Donadieu de Lavit, & de la Touanne, 2019; Baum, Palatnik, Kan, & Rapaport-Rom, 2016). Energy consumption approach: Within the GTAP-AW model, the energy consumption patterns of the water industries adhere to a specified general functional form. This approach ensures the representation of the relative energy intensities of these sectors within the established database

על אודות החוקרים

ד"ר רוסלנה רחל פלטניק

רוסלנה רחל פלטניק מרצה בכירה בחוג לכלכלה במכללת עמק יזרעאל. תחומי המחקר וההוראה המרכזיים שלה הם כלכלת הסביבה, כלכלת משאבי טבע וכלכלת האנרגיה. היא מכשירה סטודנטים לחשיבה כלכלית שכוללת גם התיחסות להשפעת האדם על הסביבה ומכאן על הרווחה החברתית שכוללת גם את ערך אויר נקי, נוף ומגוון ביולוגי. רוסלנה רחל פלטניק חוקרת ניהול אופטימאלי של מקורות משאבי טבע כגון מים וגז טבעי וביצעה הערכות לכדאיות פרויקטים של אנרגיות מתחדשות. המחקרים שלה ממוקדים בקביעת כלי מדיניות להפנמת השפעות חיצוניות וניהול אופטימאלי של משאבי הטבע והסביבה. היא פעילה בועדות החוג והמכללה, ורואה שליחות בהוראה של תאוריה כלכלית וישומיה בפועל מהזוית של שיפור רווחה חברתית וניהול אופטימאלי במיוחד בפריפריה. רוסלנה רחל פלטניק שואפת להעניק לתלמידי ממגזרים השונים ידע ישומי ומעודכן שישמש אותם גם בחיי היום-יום וגם בחיים המקצועיים.

ד"ר רוסלנה רחל פלטניק
דור פרידמן

Dor Fridman is a research scholar in the Water Security Research Group of the IIASA Biodiversity and Natural Resources Program. His research focuses on modeling the human-hydrological interface. He works to include human water technologies in the Community Water Model (CWatM), including wastewater treatment and reclamation, desalination, and water distribution networks and inter-basin water transfers.
As part of his work in the group, Fridman promotes the Water Futures and Solutions for Israel (WaFS-Israel) Project, using the CWatM to simulate current and future water cycles for two important Israeli river basins. The simulations explore the effects of spatial development on discharge and on the potential for runoff harvesting. His research interests cover the vast field of human-environment interactions. Specifically, he is interested in the water-energy-food nexus, the potential of reclaiming wastewater, the benefits from green infrastructure, and urban hydrology (e.g., the potential of 'Sponge Cities' to reduce water scarcity, risks for water, and risks from water).
Prior to joining IIASA, Fridman dealt extensively with interregional sustainability, the sustainability of food systems, and environmental accounting. His teaching experience includes over five years in different courses and positions. Between 2017 and 2021 he taught Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to MA students in an urban planning program at the Geography Department of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
Fridman holds PhD and MA degrees from the Department of Geography and Environmental Development at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and a BA degree in Geography and Economics from the same institution. He is also a Milken Institute Fellows' Program alumni (2012/3).

דור פרידמן

About the researchers

Dr. Ruslana Rachel Palatnik
Dr. Ruslana Rachel Palatnik

Ruslana Rachel Palatnik, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Economics and Management at the Yezreel Valley College (YVC), Israel, a Senior Research Fellow at the Natural Resources and Environmental Research Center (NRERC), University of Haifa, Israel, and a Senior Guest Research Scholar at the Integrated Assessment and Climate Change (IACC) Research Group within the Energy, Climate, and Environment (ECE) Program at IIASA- International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria. Her primary academic interests are bioeconomy, energy economics, climate change and environmental economics. To provide policy-relevant analysis, Dr. Palatnik employs quantitative analytical methods primarily for ex-ante investigation. Her research uses both top-down macro-economic analytical tools such as computable general equilibrium (CGE) and Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and bottom-up sector-level analysis employing mathematical programming and econometric methods. By spanning multiple methodologies, she aims to build a body of research evidence that combines a detailed sectoral investigation and a macroeconomic setting where the markets interact, addressing the role of alternative mechanisms and confounding factors.

Dor Fridman
Dor Fridman

Dor Fridman is a research scholar in the Water Security Research Group of the IIASA Biodiversity and Natural Resources Program. His research focuses on modeling the human-hydrological interface. He works to include human water technologies in the Community Water Model (CWatM), including wastewater treatment and reclamation, desalination, and water distribution networks and inter-basin water transfers.
As part of his work in the group, Fridman promotes the Water Futures and Solutions for Israel (WaFS-Israel) Project, using the CWatM to simulate current and future water cycles for two important Israeli river basins. The simulations explore the effects of spatial development on discharge and on the potential for runoff harvesting. His research interests cover the vast field of human-environment interactions. Specifically, he is interested in the water-energy-food nexus, the potential of reclaiming wastewater, the benefits from green infrastructure, and urban hydrology (e.g., the potential of 'Sponge Cities' to reduce water scarcity, risks for water, and risks from water).
Prior to joining IIASA, Fridman dealt extensively with interregional sustainability, the sustainability of food systems, and environmental accounting. His teaching experience includes over five years in different courses and positions. Between 2017 and 2021 he taught Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to MA students in an urban planning program at the Geography Department of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
Fridman holds PhD and MA degrees from the Department of Geography and Environmental Development at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and a BA degree in Geography and Economics from the same institution. He is also a Milken Institute Fellows' Program alumni (2012/3).

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